Self Assessment Tax Return – what do I do?

Published by HMRC At HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) we strive to make it as easy as possible for you to submit your Self Assessment tax return but we know that sometimes you’ll need our help. More than 85% of customers chose to submit their return online last year, with even more expected in 2016. You can do it at a time convenient to you – day or night – and there’s online support available too, including web chat and general queries answered on Twitter @HMRCcustomers. Here, we answer some of our customers more common queries: Do I need to fill in a tax return? Over ten million people in the UK need to complete a tax return. Find out if you’re one of them by taking our handy online test. HMRC will always notify you if we are expecting you to complete a tax return. Can you help me register for the Online Self Assessment Service? If you are a new online user, you will need to register first. Go to online.hmrc.gov.uk/registration and follow the instructions to enrol for online services. Please remember to make a note of the User ID that we allocate to you, as you will need that later in the process. You will then receive your activation code through the post. Please follow the instructions provided to activate your online account as soon as possible. Can you help me obtain a new user ID and/or password? If you’ve already registered but lost your log in details here are a few handy links to request new ones, without having to phone the helpline: User ID...

From broken kitchen appliances, hungry pets and arguments that last five years – some people will stop at nothing to pass the blame for their tardy timekeeping. 1. My tax papers were left in the shed and the rat ate them 2. I’m not a paperwork-orientated person – I always relied on my sister to complete my returns but we have now fallen out 3. My accountant has been ill 4. My dog ate my tax return 5. I will be abroad on deadline day with no internet access so will be unable to file 6. My laptop broke, so did my washing machine 7. My niece had moved in – she made the house so untidy I could not find my log-in details to complete my return online 8. My husband ran over my laptop 9. I had an argument with my wife and went to Italy for 5 years 10. I had a cold which took a long time to go The excuses were all used in unsuccessful appeals against HMRC penalties for late returns. While HMRC will not accept spurious excuses when the vast majority hit the deadline and pay up what they owe, we recognise that a number of taxpayers may have difficulties completing their tax return on time. For instance, those affected by flooding at their premises, or their agents’ premises, will not be asked to pay a penalty if their return is submitted without unreasonable delay. The department has also opened a Tax Helpline to give practical help and advice to people affected by severe weather and flooding – 0800 904 7900. Ruth...

HMRC Self Assessment deadline is fast approaching

If you’re self employed then you’ll know (or should know!) that 31st January is a significant date. It’s the day by which your self assessment return needs to be submitted and also your tax liability paid. If you haven’t tackled yours yet there are plenty of bookkeepers out there who can help you. Make contact now if you need your return done. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new...

Tobacco crime gang sentenced

Five men have been sentenced for their role in trying to flood the UK with illicit cigarettes, tobacco and alcohol, worth hundreds of thousands of pounds in lost duty and taxes, and attempting to launder their criminal profits. Irvin Dunn, 56, who orchestrated the fraud from behind bars, and his brother Wayne Dunn, 57, from South Yorkshire, were today jailed for their involvement in the distribution and sale of the illicit goods between January 2013 and October 2013. Lee Pearson, 33, of South Yorkshire, was also sentenced for his part in the conspiracy while Vincent McGeough, 68, from County Armagh, Northern Ireland, and James Woods, 58, from Dundalk, in the Republic of Ireland, were sentenced for money laundering after the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) investigation. Stuart Taylor, Assistant Director, Fraud Investigation Service, HMRC, said: “These men all played a part in flooding the UK with illegal cigarettes, tobacco and alcohol solely to line their own pockets with money that should have been funding vital public services. “Irvin Dunn even pulled the strings while he was in prison using coded messages. But their fraud has been broken down and picked apart and now they are all paying the price. “The evasion of excise duty is a criminal offence. If you are caught you will not only have your goods seized but you may also face prosecution and, if convicted, a criminal record and potentially a prison sentence. Anyone with information about the illegal trade in smuggled cigarettes and tobacco should contact the Customs hotline on 0800 59 5000.” The full extent of the fraud began to unravel after HMRC...

HMRC Achievements in 2015

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has had a very successful year with record-breaking and sustained results through 2015 by increasing revenues, reducing costs and improving customer service. The continued transformation through digital services, including new powers being provided to HMRC due from 2016 onward, means the department is on target to further improve customer service and crackdown on tax cheats, bringing vital revenues for public services. HMRC Spokesperson “HMRC has had its most successful and sustained performance in its ten-year history. The department has achieved successive record-breaking revenues, last year alone bringing in more than £517 billion and increased compliance yields to £26.6 billion, up by 43% since 2011/12 – all achieved through tougher enforcement and record prosecutions of tax cheats. “All of this was delivered at the same time as improving our customer service and continuing to roll-out a transformation programme that will see us reduce our estate costs by £100m per year by 2025. “This is a record of achievement which gave Ministers the confidence to reinvest £2.1 billion in HMRC’s further transformation in the 2015 Spending Review.” Key achievements of 2015: – Overall revenues raised by HMRC increased by 9% – from £474.2 billion in 2011-12 to a record £517.7 billion in 2014-15. – Compliance revenues – the yield we collect and protect that people try not to pay – increased by 43% from £18.6 billion in 2011-12 to £26.6 billion in 2014-15. – The tax gap – the difference between the amount of tax that should, in theory be collected by HMRC, against what is actually collected – fell from 6.6% of tax due in...

VAT Fraud gang 

Three men jailed for 13 years for their part in a multi-million pound fuel and VAT fraud have been ordered to pay back almost £6.9 million or face more time behind bars. Senior citizen Michael Wilmot, 73, led the Lincolnshire gang that was jailed in July 2014 after an investigation by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) found they had evaded millions in duty and tax through a sophisticated fraud. Wilmot, transport manager Michael Taylor, 39, and HGV driver Derek Blackburn, 61, all from Market Rasen, appeared at Hull Crown Court where the confiscation orders were granted. David Cowie, Assistant Director, Fraud Investigation Service, HMRC, said: “Our investigations do not stop at sentencing. It is crucial we look to stop criminals profiting from their crimes and reclaim as much as possible to put it back where it belongs – funding vital public services across the UK. “This criminal gang were put behind bars for stealing millions of pounds. Now they must pay back what they owe otherwise they will be spending more years in prison.” Wilmot used connections to a farmers’ buying consortium in Louth to order large quantities of rebated fuel, commonly known as red diesel. Unknown to the consortium, the fuel was sold on and used illegally in heavy goods vehicles (HGV) belonging to 35 different companies, all with connections to Wilmot. In an extension of the fraud, Wilmot played his part in issuing invoices for the haulage work carried out by the companies, charging customers VAT on their services. But instead of paying the VAT to HMRC, he pocketed the cash. In addition, none of the companies...