Paying HMRC by personal credit card

Paying HMRC by personal credit card

From 13 January 2018 HMRC will no longer be accepting payments made from personal credit cards. HMRC is only allowed to accept credit card payments on the basis that there is no cost to the public purse, and the EU Payment Services Directive 2, which comes into effect on this date, prohibits merchants (including HMRC) from recharging associated fees back to customers. Corporate, business and commercial credit cards are not affected by this change and HMRC will continue to accept personal and commercial debit cards. Customers will continue to have alternative payment options including: Direct DebtFaster PaymentBACSDebit CardCHAPS Details of ways to pay self assessment can be found on GOV.UK https://www.gov.uk/pay-self-assessment-tax-bill Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new...

Tax year 2016/2017 – changes

We are now in the 2016/2017 tax year and many changes have taken place. If you are employed and over 25 your minimum living wage is now £7.20 per hour – see my previous post for more information. FOr those who are self employed the amount you are allowed to earn before paying tax in this year is £10,800 and next year will rise again to £11,000. If you have previously paid your class 2 national insurance contributions by direct debit this will change and they will be calculated and paid along with your self assessment tax and your class 4 national insurance. More information on the changes can be found on the HMRC website here Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new...

HMRC taxing tax digital

HMRC taking tax digital Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new...

Marriage Allowance

A little publicised marriage allowance has been introduced by HMRC which could mean that the average married couple could be better off by £212 per year. This is called Marriage Allowance and must be applied for. You can apply here. Basically you can transfer £1,060 of your personal allowance (the amount you can earn before paying tax) to your partner and this will reduce their tax liability by up to £212 for the tax year. The lower earner must have an income of £10,600 or less but you can visit the HMRC page to find out more information and apply for marriage allowance. The higher earner has to be earning between £10,601 and £42,385. Your application is completed online with HMRC’s marriage allowance application page and if the application is successful it will be backdated to 6th April. If you are employed or receive a pension the allowance will be given via a change in tax code. For the majority this will be to 1166M meaning that you will have £11,600 of personal allowance. If you are self-employed the marriage allowance will be given when your self assessment tax return form (SA100) is submitted. Marriage allowance continues each year unless you notify HMRC of a change in circumstances or either party cancels it. Bruton Young Bookkeeping can point you in the right direction for advice on a variety of financial matters. We have a panel of financial advisors and accountants that can assist with financial advice. Contact us for more information. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share...

National Living Wage April 2016

From 1 April 2016 workers aged 25 and over will be legally entitled to a new minimum pay rate of £7.20 per hour, called the National Living Wage (NLW). As an employer you’ll need to check which staff are eligible for the new rates and update your payroll in time. Do you need help with this process or with running payroll for your staff? HMRC are running a number of free webinars to give you more information about the Living Wage (NLW). For more information see the HMRC living wage website here Bruton Young Bookkeeping can advice you on how to implement this and its impact on your bottom line profits, also how to minimise this impact. Contact us for more information. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new...

HMRC SA100 Self Assessment Payments on Account

I have been asked many times recently to explain to clients and friends how HMRC’s payments on account system works when submitting an SA100 Self Assessment Tax Return. It is probably best explained by way of an example – see below SA PoA If you would like an editable version of this file for your own use please use the contact us link and send us a message requesting the editable file. There is also more guidance from HMRC here   The assumption is that as time moves on your business will increase its profits. Once you have payable tax of more than £1,000 then you become liable to make payments on account. These equate to half of the previous years tax liability. So for example, if you have a tax liability for 2014-2015 of £2,000 you will need to make payments on account towards 2015-2016 of £2,000. These payments are made in two parts, half in January and half in July. Obviously these are then deducted from the bill next year and new payments on account are calculated. We are happy to explain these figures in more detail and personalise them to your own liabilities if necessary. Just contact us!   Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to...